The Margaret River. Photo B Wykes

The Margaret River. Photo B Wykes

A REFUGE FOR WILDLIFE

The Capes region of south west Australia is an area of high biodiversity combined with an enviably intact natural environment and a climate ameliorated from extremes by its coastal positioning. Although not immune from a changing climate, the Capes region has capacity to provide refuge for species that are under even greater pressure elsewhere in south west WA. Habitat conservation and species protection are vital for the refuge potential of our region to be achieved.

Tawny Frogmouths. Photo S Castan

OWLS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Tucked away in their roosts, owls are rarely seen during the day. You may be lucky enough to spot Tawny Frogmouths masquerading as branches. Denizens of the night, a variety of owls and their kin hunt on silent wings, feeding and raising their chicks in our forests, farmlands and gardens largely unknown to their human cohabitants.

FIND OUT MORE >

Tawny Frogmouths. Photo S Castan

OWLS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Tucked away in their roosts, owls are rarely seen during the day. You may be lucky enough to spot Tawny Frogmouths masquerading as branches. Denizens of the night, a variety of owls and their kin hunt on silent wings, feeding and raising their chicks in our forests, farmlands and gardens largely unknown to their human cohabitants.

FIND OUT MORE >

Tawny Frogmouths. Photo S Castan

OWLS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Tucked away in their roosts, owls are rarely seen during the day. You may be lucky enough to spot Tawny Frogmouths masquerading as branches. Denizens of the night, a variety of owls and their kin hunt on silent wings, feeding and raising their chicks in our forests, farmlands and gardens largely unknown to their human cohabitants.

FIND OUT MORE >

THE MASKED OWL

Until recently few knew that the Augusta Margaret River Region is a stronghold for the Masked Owl, a large forest relative of the Barn Owl, which can handle possums, phascogales and rabbits but primarily feeds on introduced black rats and house mice.

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Masked Owl with rat. Photo S Castan

Masked Owl with rat. Photo S Castan

THE MASKED OWL

Until recently few knew that the Augusta Margaret River Region is a stronghold for the Masked Owl, a large forest relative of the Barn Owl, which can handle possums, phascogales and rabbits but primarily feeds on introduced black rats and house mice.

FIND OUT MORE >

Masked Owl with rat. Photo S Castan

THE MASKED OWL

Until recently few knew that the Augusta Margaret River Region is a stronghold for the Masked Owl, a large forest relative of the Barn Owl, which can handle possums, phascogales and rabbits but primarily feeds on introduced black rats and house mice.

FIND OUT MORE >

Masked Owl corpse. Photo P Trusler

THE RODENTICIDE THREAT

Just when we were discovering that Masked Owls glide out from roosts and nests in ancient marri and karri to hunt around our homes and farms, tissue testing revealed that these and other nocturnal birds are being killed by eating rats and mice that have ingested rat baits widely used by commercial operators and available on hardware and supermarket shelves.

FIND OUT MORE >

Masked Owl corpse. Photo P Trusler

THE RODENTICIDE THREAT

Just when we were discovering that Masked Owls glide out from roosts and nests in ancient marri and karri to hunt around our homes and farms, tissue testing revealed that these and other nocturnal birds are being killed by eating rats and mice that have ingested rat baits widely used by commercial operators and available on hardware and supermarket shelves.

FIND OUT MORE >

Masked Owl corpse. Photo P Trusler

THE RODENTICIDE THREAT

Just when we were discovering that Masked Owls glide out from roosts and nests in ancient marri and karri to hunt around our homes and farms, tissue testing revealed that these and other nocturnal birds are being killed by eating rats and mice that have ingested rat baits widely used by commercial operators and available on hardware and supermarket shelves.

FIND OUT MORE >

OWL FORENSIC DETECTIVES

Local observations, citizen science and academic research are filling in gaps in our knowledge about the enigmatic Masked Owls, their habitat, breeding and diet.

Liver analysis of dead owls and other wildlife that are handed in to vets and wildlife carers is revealing rodenticide chemicals at levels directly resulting in death or debilitation contributing to death by disease, starvation and vehicle strike.

FIND OUT MORE >

Vet Felicity Bradshaw dissecting a Masked Owl. Photo S Castan

Vet Felicity Bradshaw dissecting a Masked Owl. Photo S Castan

OWL FORENSIC DETECTIVES

Local observations, citizen science and academic research are filling in gaps in our knowledge about the enigmatic Masked Owls, their habitat, breeding and diet.

Liver analysis of dead owls and other wildlife that are handed in to vets and wildlife carers is revealing rodenticide chemicals at levels directly resulting in death or debilitation contributing to death by disease, starvation and vehicle strike.

FIND OUT MORE >

Vet Felicity Bradshaw dissecting a Masked Owl. Photo B Wykes

OWL FORENSIC DETECTIVES

Local observations, citizen science and academic research are filling in gaps in our knowledge about the enigmatic Masked Owls, their habitat, breeding and diet.

Liver analysis of dead owls and other wildlife that are handed in to vets and wildlife carers is revealing rodenticide chemicals at levels directly resulting in death or debilitation contributing to death by disease, starvation and vehicle strike.

FIND OUT MORE >